Denis Ménochet and Barry Keoghan in Martin Radich's Norfolk

Norfolk

Lissy Lovett has quite a lot of time for new feature Norfolk, but is baffled by the sight of a narrow boat on the Broads.

Norfolk is a county in the east of England. It’s where I was born and grew up, and it’s my favourite place in the world. Not that many people live there, but those that do are often unconventional and self-contained. There were once many Air Force bases, fewer now, but I’d often see strange planes in the sky when I was growing up. Norfolk is generally flat, with skies that go on forever, and has a series of man-made lakes, called the Broads, formed by medieval peat excavations. Continue reading Norfolk

Dare to be Wild still of Cork coast

Dare to Be Wild

The problem with a film based on a real story is that you always know how it is going to end.

Mary Reynolds (Emma Greenwell) wants to enter the Chelsea Flower Show with her wild Celtic garden and win the gold medal. To do this she needs the help of reluctant botanist  Christy Collard (Tom Hughes), £250,000 in sponsorship, and to convince the show to accept her entry. Continue reading Dare to Be Wild

Stormy Weather

Sarah Slade considers if Stormy Weather has weathered the storm.

stormy-weather

There is a school of thought that maintains that musicals of the Hollywood Golden Age were at the forefront of social commentary. Look at Carousel, with its depiction of domestic violence, single parenthood and walking on through the wind and the rain. Or Oklahoma in the light of Judd’s mental illness. Let’s skip over the message behind Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and look at Showboat, which has actual people of colour singing songs about rivers and takes a sideways look the trials of being mixed-race in the Deep South.

Continue reading Stormy Weather

Miss Fisher does Pulp Fiction

Fashion against crime

Is there a correlation between sartorial savvy and the ability to nab a wrong ‘un? TheTramp investigates. 

If there is one genre that television loves, it is that of the detective drama. From gritty police procedural dramas, through to whimsical amateur detectives in quaint but deadly villages, there always seems to be a show on some channel or another, new or repeat (sorry, classic), with murders that need solving and solved they invariably are, the pleasure generally being how they are solved and by whom.

Continue reading Fashion against crime

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El Sur (The South)

Susan Patterson watches Victor Erice’s Spanish classic

“Can it be that an unfinished film is one of the best in Spanish cinema history? Yes it can… 95 minutes of emotions so intense that you’re left breathless. I cry every time I watch it.” Pedro Almodóvar

Estrella (Icíar Bollaín), is close to her doctor father, Agustin (Omero Antonutti) but mystified by his past, and how it has made him the slightly distant man he has become.

Continue reading El Sur (The South)

The Samurai Trilogy

Spank The Monkey looks at Criterion’s new release of a neglected landmark in Japanese cinema.

samurai-trilogy

Musashi Miyamoto is the Samurai. No, scratch that: Musashi Miyamoto is the Samurai. For generations of Japanese, this 17th century wandering swordsman has been the ideal representation of the country’s warrior class. A painter, an author, and a swordsman who won over sixty duels: if he didn’t already exist, someone would have had to invent him. And even though he did exist, people have been inventing him anyway: for centuries Japanese culture has repeatedly taken the bare bones of his story and manufactured new myths out of it. Continue reading The Samurai Trilogy

Departure

Sarah Slade looks at a beautiful retread of an old theme.

 

Alex Lawther and Juliet Stevenson in DepartureThere isn’t much that is new about Departure. An English family rattle around their French holiday home, replete with colour-washed walls, Le Creuset everything and a lovely collection of china. An enigmatic stranger appears and there is a sexual awakening. Everybody goes home, wiser, sadder and ready to face the future. It’s a theme that has been explored in many ways, by many film makers over many years. You could even say that middle-class angst in Aude is quite a safe topic for first-time director Andrew Steggall, but that would detract from what is a rather beautiful, sensitively acted film. Continue reading Departure

Psychomania

Britain’s finest ever zombie biker movie has come back from the dead, courtesy of the BFI and Scalarama. Spank The Monkey takes a ride with the Death Wheelers.

Psychomania BFI Blu-ray/DVD cover

If you had to identify the best-loved post on MostlyFilm – and I mean properly loved, rather than merely popular because it comes high on a Google search for ‘young boy handjob’ – then I suspect that Ricky Young’s four-part series If My Calculations Are Correct would be a prime candidate. It acknowledges that we don’t watch films in a vacuum: the circumstances of their viewing are as important as the films themselves. IMCAC isn’t just about a collection of science fiction classics – it’s about young Ricky encountering them every Tuesday teatime on BBC2, and having his mind opened to a whole genre of cinema. Continue reading Psychomania